November 4, 2017

Saddleback College

Local Host: Todd Brei

Order of Magnitude question: How many 8.5 x 11″ sheets of paper are used by US high schools during a school year?

The meeting will take place in SCI 111 (on the first floor of the science building).

Annotated campus map

From the I-5, exit Avery Parkway. If coming from LA/ north of campus, turn left on Avery.  If coming from SD/ south of campus, turn right on Avery. Continue to past Marguerite Parkway. Turn left at the top of the hill, onto campus at College Drive. (“Avery Entrance” on the annotated map) Make a right at the T, follow the road around over several speed bumps and through a couple stop signs. Lot #7 is on your left, as soon as you pass the baseball field on the right. If lot #7 is full, continue past the SCI building to lot #5. Daily parking can be purchased at any kiosk for $5.00 per day. (Please note that there are no kiosks in lots #5 & 7.  You must visit a kiosk in another lot.  These are indicated on the annotated map as stars.)

SCAAPT will refund the $5 parking charge at the registration table for those who pay the $10 meeting fee.  (Purchase the daily permit as described above, then register and collect the refund.)

Box lunches will be available to those who reserve one ahead of time. The $10 lunches will consist of a Rubios burrito (grilled steak, chicken or vegetables), side, desert and drink. To reserve a lunch (and please only do so if you will be attending the meeting), complete the online form prior to November 1. (The deadline for reservations has passed.)

To submit an abstract for a presentation or Show & Tell, please to complete the online submission form prior to October 13. (The deadline for submissions has passed.)

8:00-9:15 AM Registration, Refreshments
9:10-9:15 AM Welcome and Announcements
9:15-9:30 AM Playing with NASA Cliff Gerstman, Middle College High SchoolNASA offers free games and activities appropriate for the High School level. These games are NGSS complaint and fun while teaching a multitude of lessons.
9:30-9:45 AM Using an authentic assessment for Hooke’s Law Jonathan Stamper, Palos Verdes Peninsula High SchoolI will show how a concrete and quick method can be employed to assess the knowledge of Hooke’s Law and the equation relating to the period of a spring. This assessment is a culmination of a two day laboratory exercise for Hooke’s Law. This assessment has a “common core” flavor.
9:45-10:00 AM A resource for Middle and High Schools introducing High Energy Physics: QuarkNet Robert Baker, Wildwood SchoolHigh energy physics discoveries at CERN, Fermi Lab, SLAC etc. are exciting. QuarkNet is part of the the outreach for this community. UC Riverside hosts our neighborhood QuarkNet. There are many resources that are available through workshops and online websites. Some of these will be presented.
10:00-10:15 AM Public outreach – 500,000 people at a time Jeff Phillips, Loyola Marymount UniversityTED-Ed is one venue where teachers can share ideas with people around the world. Educators can nominate themselves to collaborate on a lesson. The key word is “collaborate”. Lessons are created by an educator, writer, animator and multiple editors. While this process can yield wonderful interdisciplinary results, it also can be full of difficulties. I will share my experiences developing a lesson and explain how other educators can get involved.
10:15-10:30 AM Future Workshop Possibilities Bill LaytonSeveral inexpensive examples of physics equipment will be demonstrated that are easy to construct and should be helpful in a high school class. One or two of these could become a project in a future morning workshop at an SCAAPT meeting. This presentation is intended to assess participant interest in any of this equipment.
10:30-10:45 AM Operation and Thermodynamics of Peltier Devices Lee Loveridge, Los Angeles Pierce CollegeIn this talk I will explore the operation of a Peltier solid state cooling device. I hope to help viewers understand the process and plot the equivalent of a pV diagram for the electron gas.
10:45-11:00 AM The Calculus-Based Physics Tutorial Program at CSU Los Angeles: An Assessment of Utility, Gains, and Student Group Dynamics Smbat Avetyan, CSU Los AngelesThe presentation will cover the following topics: What overall effect does the physics tutorial program have on the Physics 200 series curriculum at CSU Los Angeles. What is the correlation of tutorial gains with student final course grades. Group interactions in the tutorial program – Students behavior in group settings can hinder learning for novice physics learners.
11:00-11:30 AM Looking at Protein Molecules through Super Bright X-rays Nuwan Karunaratne, Cypress CollegeDiffusion of protein molecules from mammalian eye lenses were studied using super bright X-ray photons, from a machine called a synchrotron. The study is a stepping stone to the novel field of X-ray scattering of biological solutions. By changing the sample concentration and temperature, dynamics of the molecules revealed important structural variation. The scattered photons were captured by a very efficient area detector that was sensitive to x-ray photons. The project is an ongoing interdisciplinary effort between Physics, Biochemistry, and Computer Science.
11:30 AM – 12:00 PM Show & Tell (Sign up when you check in)
12:00-1:15 PM Lunch
1:15-2:15 PM ImageJ in the Physics Classroom Jo Ann Merrell, Saddleback CollegeThe physics classroom should be a place where students actively use the tools of professional scientists to explore and understand the physical world. ImageJ is an open source Java image processing program developed by the National Institute of Health which allows students the opportunity to investigate and apply physics principles to real situations. From roller coasters to basket ball games videos capture the action and ImageJ reveals the data. Instruction in the use of basic measurement tools and their application to several labs will be covered. Complete lab instructions and videos will be made available; bring a flash drive – 4 GB or larger.
2:20-2:45 PM Thomas Young and the Rosetta Stone Harry Manos, Los Angeles City CollegeThomas Young (1773 – 1829) is best known in the physics community for his double-slit experiment demonstrating the wave property of light and for his work on the tensile properties of solids (Young’s modulus). His reputation as a physicist was built upon a three-year period (1801 – 1803) as an instructor in physics and philosophy at the Royal Institution. This paper will present Young’s seven breakthrough discoveries made during another short period in his life (1814 – 1818) that led to solving the ancient Egyptian language as a whole.
2:45-3:15 PM Magnetic Resonance Imaging – The Applications, the Science, and Lab Ideas Sanaz “Sunny” Taghizadeh, UCLA, Hoag Hospital Newport BeachNMR and MRI have been used by medical professionals for decades far surpassing x-rays photographs in detail and safety (especially for soft tissue imaging). In this talk, I will discuss the basic physics of nuclear magnetic resonance, and explain how MRI images are created and interpreted. Also discussed are some desktop laboratory devices that can help this emerging technology be a hands-on experience for students in the classroom.
3:15-3:45 PM Superconductors in the high school classroom James Lincoln, PhysicsVideos.com, The Physics Teacher – Journal, AAPTIn this talk, I will demonstrate and discuss the behavior of high temperature superconductors and how to employ them safely in the high school classroom. Included here is a discussion of the most relevant physics topics that can be demonstrated, some safety tips, and a bit of the history of superconductors. In an effort to include high schoolers in the world of modern physics, a topic as engaging as superconductivity should not be missed. It is an opportunity to inspire students to study physics through the myriad of possible applications that high temperature superconductors hold for the future.
3:45PM The World Famous “Order of Magnitude Contest” and Door Prizes Meeting Adjourns

On Saturday, November 4, 2017, fifty members of the Southern California Section of AAPT gathered at Saddleback College for a day filled with new physics and helpful advice for the classroom.

Jo Ann Merrell, Saddleback College, led a session on how a multiplatform application, ImageJ, can be used for image analysis in the classroom. ImageJ is an open source Java image processing program developed by the National Institute of Health. Prof. Merrell showed how this application allows here students to investigate and apply physics principles to real situations. She provided attendees with instruction on the use of basic measurement tools and sample classroom activities, which, along with the necessary image and video files, she provided to attendees

Several other SCAAPT members also gave engaging contributed presentations:

  • Cliff Gerstman, Middle College High School– Playing with NASA
  • Jonathan Stamper, Palos Verdes Peninsula High School– Using an authentic assessment for Hooke’s Law
  • Robert Baker, Wildwood School High– A resource for Middle and High Schools introducing High Energy Physics: QuarkNet
  • Jeff Phillips, Loyola Marymount University– Public outreach – 500,000 people at a time
  • Bill Layton– Future Workshop Possibilities
  • Lee Loveridge, Los Angeles Pierce College– Operation and Thermodynamics of Peltier Devices
  • Smbat Avetyan, CSU Los Angeles– The Calculus-Based Physics Tutorial Program at CSU Los Angeles: An Assessment of Utility, Gains, and Student Group Dynamics
  • Nuwan Karunaratne, Cypress College– Looking at Protein Molecules through Super Bright X-rays
  • Harry Manos, Los Angeles City College– Thomas Young and the Rosetta Stone
  • James Lincoln, PhysicsVideos.com, The Physics Teacher–  Superconductors in the high school classroom

The ever-popular Show ‘n’ Tell featured demonstrations by James Lincoln (retro reflectors), Bob Baker (Quarknet), John McGuffie (Sanford Underground Research Facility) and Larry Stein (compact object merger analog). The meeting ended with our traditional “World Famous Order of Magnitude Question” discussion, led by Bill Layton, James Lincoln and Cliff Gerstman, and the raffle of donated door prizes.

SCAAPT thanks Todd Brei and the Saddleback College Physics Department for hosting the meeting.  Thanks also to Chad Kishimoto, for serving as Program Chair of the meeting.